Overview of the French Political System

I have been thinking to post my notes from Comparative Politics course for a while. Comparative politics is the study of the domestic politics, political institutions, and conflicts of countries. It is one of the basic courses that every student Political Science or International Relations student needs to take. In my opinion every citizen  should know these things in order to have an ability to compare and evaluate the system of  their countries with the others.

At the end I decided to write them down. My aims are; to deepen my understanding, to provide brief information about the political systems to my followers and to prepare study guides to my classmates for the final exam.  I hope you will enjoy and learn while reading. Thanks for your visit!

I have published my posts on U.S.A. and  Germany before, now it is time for France;

french-flag

The government of the French Republic is a semi-presidential system determined by the French Constitution of the fifth Republic. The nation declares itself to be an “indivisible, secular, democratic, and social Republic”.The constitution provides for a separation of powers and proclaims France’s “attachment to the Rights of Man and the principles of national sovereignty as defined by the Declaration of 1789.”

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Overview of the German Political System

I have been thinking to post my notes from Comparative Politics course for a while. Comparative politics is the study of the domestic politics, political institutions, and conflicts of countries. It is one of the basic courses that every student Political Science or International Relations student needs to take. In my opinion every citizen  should know these things in order to have an ability to compare and evaluate the system of  their countries with the others.

At the end I decided to write them down. My aims are; to deepen my understanding, to provide brief information about the political systems to my followers and to prepare study guides to my classmates for the final exam. I hope you will enjoy and learn while reading. Thanks for your visit!

Let’s begin with Germany;

German flag

 

Germany is a federal parliamentary republic, and federal legislative power is vested in the Bundestag (the parliament of Germany) and the Bundesrat (the representative body of the Länder, Germany’s regional states). There is a multi-party system that, since 1949, has been dominated by the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD). The judiciary of Germany is independent of the executive and the legislature. The political system is laid out in the 1949 constitution, the Grundgesetz (Basic Law), which remained in effect with minor amendments after German reunification in 1990.

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Overview Of The U.S. Political System

I have been thinking to post my notes from Comparative Politics course for a while. Comparative politics is the study of the domestic politics, political institutions, and conflicts of countries. It is one of the basic courses that every student Political Science or International Relations student needs to take. In my opinion every citizen  should know these things in order to have an ability to compare and evaluate the system of  their countries with the others.

At the end I decided to write them down. My aims are; to deepen my understanding, to provide brief information about the political systems to my followers and to prepare study guides to my classmates for the final exam. I hope you will enjoy and learn while reading. Thanks for your visit!

Let’s start with United States of America;

USAs-Worst-President

Key Facts:

  1. The system of U.S. is a Federal system. This means that power is divided between a central/national government and the States. The national government is referred to as the Federal Government.
  2. The Federal Government has three branches/arms:There are 50 States. Each State has an elected Governor and a legislature consisting of a State House and a State Senate
    • Legislative Branch: House of Representatives and Senate
    • Executive Branch: President, Cabinet, Federal Departments and Agencies
    • Judicial Branch: Supreme Court, Other Federal Courts
  3. The United States is a federal constitutional republic, in which the President of the United States (the head of state and head of government), Congress, and judiciary share powers reserved to the national government, and the federal government shares sovereignty with the state governments.

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Welcome

WELCOME

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Beni daha yakından tanımak ve CV’me göz atmak için About Me sayfasını inceleyebilirsiniz

ELT kategorisinde İngilizce öğrenimi ve öğretimi hakkındaki yazılarımı bulabilirsiniz.

IR kategorisinde Politika ve Uluslararası İlişkiler alanındaki yazılarımı okuyabilirsiniz.

Travels kategorisinden paylaştığım gezi yazılarıma ulaşabilirsiniz.

MUN kategorisinden Model Birleşmiş Milletler programları ile ilgili paylaşımlarımı takip edebilirsiniz.

Soru, görüş ve önerileriniz için Contact sayfasından benimle iletişim kurabilirsiniz.

Şimdilik bu kadar, umarım paylaşımlarım sizin için faydalı ve eğlenceli olur. Ziyaretiniz için teşekkür ederim. 🙂


A warm welcome to all my followers. I have been thinking to create a blog and post regularly for a long time. At the end hopefully I took an action.

You may see all my posts through Blog .

To learn about me more you may visit About Me page.

ELT Category is for the posts which are related to English Teaching and Learning.

IR Category is for my posts that I wrote on Politics and International Relations.

MUN category is for the posts about Model United Nations conferences.

Travels Category is include the posts about my trips and travels.

For your questions or comments you may use  Contact page.

That’s all for now, I hope my posts will be useful and entertaining for you. Thanks a lot for your visit.  🙂

Carne Ross: An Independent Diplomat

As a student of International Relations, this video from ted.com inspired me a lot. Here is the story of a former diplomat. After 15 years in the British diplomatic corps, Carne Ross became a “freelance diplomat,” running a bold nonprofit that gives small, developing and yet-unrecognized nations a voice in international relations. At the BIF-5 conference, he calls for a new kind of diplomacy that gives voice to small countries, that works with changing boundaries and that welcomes innovation.

Why you should listen? Carne Ross was a member of the British diplomat corps for a decade and a half — until a crisis of faith in the system drove him to go freelance. With his nonprofit, Independent Diplomat , he and a team advise small and developing nations without a diplomatic corps, as well as unrecognized nations that would otherwise lack a voice in negotiations on their own futures. His group helped advise the Kosovars in their quest for recognition as a nation, and with Croatia on its application to join the EU. They’re now working with Southern Sudan as it approaches a vote to separate (a vote that, on Sept. 8, 2010, US Secretary of State Clinton called “inevitable”).

As Ross said to Time magazine, when it profiled him in a 2008 story called “Innovators/Peacemakers”: “Our work is based on the belief that everybody has a right to some say in the resolution of their issues.” He’s the author of the 2007 book Independent Diplomat: Dispatches from an Unaccountable Elite.